Top Electric Car Makers for the United States Market

By John Addison (original post at Clean Fleet Report)

By 2011 year end, competition will be intense for electric car leadership. The Clean Fleet Report Top 10 Electric Car Makers describes our best guess about the market share leaders for delivered plug-in vehicles on the United States roads in 2011, although not necessarily in order of 2011 installed market share.

Tesla is the first to sell 1,000 electric cars for the U.S. highways. Like its Roadster, the company is going zero to sixty in less than four seconds. In August the company reported its first profits. With $465 million in DOE loans, the company is developing a roomy Model S hatchback that starts at $57,400, about half the price of the Roadster. The Roadster is battery-electric with a 240 mile range; the Model S may have a remarkable electric range of 300 miles per charge.

Nissan (NSANY) will be the first auto maker to put over 10,000 electric cars on U.S. highways. Major cities have already committed to over 10,000 Nissan Leaf and over 10,000 charge stations. Nissan will start taking dealer orders from individuals in the spring of 2010. Nissan plans to make the 5-seat hatchback affordable, but sale and/or lease options have not been finalized. The Nissan Leaf is battery-electric with a 100 mile range per charge.

Toyota (TM) Prius Plug-in Hybrid (PHV) will build on the million car success of Toyota hybrids. At first glance, the PHV looks like another Prius until you spot the J1772 plug for smart charging. Five hundred PHV are now being put into fleet trails from cities to car sharing services. In 2011, U.S. dealer orders should begin. Toyota will initially control costs by only using a 5kWh battery for a 14 mile electric range. In 2012, Toyota will expand its offerings to include a pure battery-electric FT-EV.

General Motors wants to be the plug-in leader with the Chevy Volt, a plug-in hybrid with 40 miles of electric range and up to 500 miles by engaging a small gasoline engine to act as a generator. Bob Lutz says than Chevy hopes to build at least 8,000 in 2011. GM has a complete E-Flex roadmap which envisions added offerings. Converj may become the Cadillac of extend-range electrics. In the future, Opel may offer a diesel plug-in hybrid in Europe. Look for a range versus cost battle with Toyota, as the Volt achieves more electric range by adding to vehicle cost with a 16kWh battery.

Accenture (ACN) forecasts 1.5 million electric vehicles in the United States by 2015. Over 10 million electric vehicles are easily possible by 2020.


Read the complete Clean Fleet Report Top 10 Electric Car Makers John Addison publishes the Clean Fleet Report and speaks at conferences. He is the author of the new book – Save Gas, Save the Planet – now selling at Amazon and other booksellers.

5 replies
  1. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    (Please re-post)Less than 20 car companies applied for $25 BILLION DOLLARS in taxpayer money managed by a certain smug group of people at DOE in order to get loans to make green cars for Americans. This was not all of DOE that did bad things, just a private cadre of men.There was enough money to help every single one of the car companies that applied. The administrators applied their interpretations of the law in order to benefit the large lobby group-related firms and avoided every one of the“unconnected”independent American companies.The amount of lobby and influence money spent is in direct ratio to the amount of money awarded.The smaller companies, due to lower overhead, could have dramatically more productive results with the money than the large burdened companies yet the money was given out based on political career advantages for the administrators rather technology advantages for America. All of the people that reviewed the applications had political and financial connections to GM, Ford, Chrysler and the large Detroit recipients.Each of those smaller American companies had technology and resources that presented a strong economic threat, if they got the loans, to the large politically connected companies that did receive funds.Some of the companies that have gotten money have backed out of making the electric cars they said they would make. But they still get to keep the money.The Section 136 Law was created by the lobbyists for GM, Ford & Chrysler when they saw that they were about to go bankrupt and wanted to tap into additional taxpayer dollars by claiming the money was going to be used for electric cars in order to win rapid support for Section 136 by tugging at heartstrings. In retrospect, the money mostly went to gasoline car projects. Multiple public hearings have already shown the sister loan guarantee program to have been a failed program via intentional delays, the head was fired and replaced & massive complaints have been filed by many.Some of the companies that got the money have already wasted more money than other companies applied for as their total request.Some of the companies that got taxpayer loan money are not even American companies and/or are doing their manufacturing offshore with non-American employees.Those who got the money had to fill out little, or no, paperwork, went through little, or no, review and were connected to the DOE people who gave them the money. Those who they wanted to keep out were forced to jump through more hoops, were slow-tracked in review and had no connections.The decision about who would get money was made in 2008 by a private group who then pretended there was a lengthy review throughout 2009 but in fact, the money was pre-wired for a select few.All of the things that the rejected small companies (who did not pay lobby fees) were rejected for, were the same things that the insider big companies were doing.

  2. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    It will be interesting to see how many customers actually line up to by plug in hybrids or EV's. If gas remains below 3 bucks a gallon and the economy is still weak, can't see them selling too many.

  3. contract hire
    contract hire says:

    I really do hope that more of these electric cars come out and get the mile rage and the speed sorted. I think the one problem with them is what happens when you run out of power, how do you recharge it quickly? One other thing is going to be price as a lot of people may not be able to afford electric cars so unless there are ways to get them on contract hire a lot of people won't get them Other than that though I think they are coming along great and hopefully will be here in time to help save the planet.

  4. Tom
    Tom says:

    Well, I'm glad to see that GM made it on the list. I like GM cars, and trucks, but I hate the fact that they took advantage of the American people, and the government. Not to mention the lack of wheelchair accessible vehicles that they have. It surprises me that they moved onto electric cars so quick though. At first they seemed content on continuing to do what they have been doing. Making cars with good miles per gallon. There press conferences were always very shady too. Good vehicles, bad people I guess.

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