Reporting from Omaha

Over the weekend, I attended the annual shareholder’s meeting of Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:  BRK.A, BRK.B) in Omaha to hear the wit and wisdom of CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger.  For five hours on Saturday, Buffett and Munger fielded questions from panelists and investors on a wide range of topics.  A good synopsis of the often amusing banter was provided by an ongoing blog operated by the New York Times.

During the marathon Q&A session — quite impressive for a pair of octogenarians to endure — Buffett and Munger thrice touched upon topics of relevance to the cleantech sector.

First, Buffett commented on the excellent performance of Berkshire’s railroad, BNSF, which experienced a very strong first quarter of 2013, with much higher growth in volumes than other U.S. railroads.  Buffett noted that it was very fortunate for Berkshire to have “lots of oil discovered next to BNSF’s tracks”:  BNSF is able to take advantage of the oil boom in western North Dakota associated with the Bakken shale, due to its extensive route network in the area.   A side implication is that BNSF is well-positioned to ship oil imported from Canada, whether or not the Keystone XL pipeline gets built.

Of course, BNSF also has a large exposure to coal hauling.  However, it’s important to recognize that BNSF’s coal business is mainly centered on production from the Powder River Basin, which is both incredibly cheap and low-sulfur.  As such, it remains competitive with low-cost natural gas, and is not being displaced as much from the power generation sector as is coal from Appalachia, so BNSF is unlikely to be as hard-hit by the shale bonanza as other railroads.

Second, an investor asked about the potential effects of the increasing competitiveness of solar energy on the future financial performance of Berkshire’s utility business unit, MidAmerican Energy.  The question was likely prompted by a recent report issued by the Edison Electric Institute raising the concern that solar and other forms of distributed generation may lead to reduced revenues and profitability of grid-based electric utilities as customers source a greater share of their electricity needs from on-site sources.

Buffett and Munger noted that Berkshire was aware of the declining cost of solar energy and correspondingly saw good investment opportunities in the sector, as evidenced by three very large projects acquired by MidAmerican with over $5 billion in capital requirement.  However, they noted that these plants were central-station generation, as opposed to on-site distributed generation.  Moreover, they are located in the deserts of the southwestern U.S., not in MidAmerican’s utility territories.

Extrapolating from Berkshire’s entry into solar — central powerplants in deserts — Munger was particularly skeptical that rooftop solar would pose much of a cannibalization threat anytime soon in MidAmerican’s not-so-sunny locales in the Pacific Northwest, Iowa and the United Kingdom.

Buffett asked MidAmerican’s CEO Bill Fehrman to stand in the audience and comment further.  Fehrman opined that MidAmerican’s relationships with their regulators were sufficiently positive that tariffs would be restructured if/as rooftop solar penetrates their customer base and leads to reduced revenues/profitability associated with the grid services that MidAmerican provides to its regions.

Personally, I agree with these assessments — insofar as MidAmerican’s current portfolio of territories is concerned.  For electric utilities in far sunnier locales, and with regulatory regimes that are generally more populist in their leanings, rooftop solar may sooner pose more of a downside.

Third, another investor asked about the potential impacts of climate change and of climate change policy on Berkshire’s businesses.

Buffett began his response sarcastically by noting the unseasonably warm weather that Omaha was enjoying (which it most definitely wasn’t, as attendees had to prevail against a cold windy rain to enter the auditorium).  After this Fox-worthy cheap-shot, Buffett cautiously offered that — though he certainly wasn’t an expert — he believed that there was a real chance that man-made climate change was occurring, because most of those who really understood the issue and were worried were quite compelling in their logic.

However, he was less concerned that climate change would represent a major negative force against Berkshire — especially their insurance businesses.  At several points during the day, Buffett extolled the excellence of the pricing discipline and risk assessment of Berkshire’s insurance businesses, and Buffett indicated that he didn’t think that the risk profiles of the insurance businesses had changed materially due to climate change, at least so far.

Munger then chipped in with some commentary on climate policy.  He was pessimistic that any global policy on carbon would be effective, due to the massive coordination problems between all of the various countries that would need to be signatories.  However, Munger was supportive of higher taxes on carbon fuels, which “Europe stumbled into” for reasons other than climate change.  This suggestion prompted some applause from the audience, which surprised Munger.  Buffett then noted to Munger that far from everyone applauded, which drew laughter and a much louder burst of applause from the crowd — indicating that the Berkshire shareholder base on average is probably not as concerned with this issue as is your intrepid reporter.

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  1. […] Over the weekend, I attended the annual shareholder’s meeting of Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:  BRK.A, BRK.B) in Omaha to hear the wit and wisdom of CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger.  For five hours on Saturday, Buffett and Munger fielded questions from panelists and investors on a wide range of topics.  A good synopsis […] Cleantech Blog […]

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