Speed in the Oil Patch – Automation at the Wellhead looks like Cleantech

I had a chance to wander around the Offshore Technology Conference this week and chat about some of the technologies on display.

OTC is still heavily a mechanical engineer’s conference.  Despite the high tech nature of the industry, in large part vendors are not yet leading customers, and steel still rules the day in technology.

One of the areas that interests me is speed.  Speed to find, speed to drill, speed to produce.  In every industry, speed kills.  (In the good way). Speed with more data and more controllability? That changes the way we do business.  Efficiency, speed, better, safer, cleaner.  That’s where the oil & gas industry is headed.

Superior Energy Services (NYSE:SPN) one of the largest drilling and wellhead services companies, picked up one of the technology awards with CATS, the Complete Automated Technology System.  Neat stuff.  Basically, take a small workover rig that needs half a dozen or so people and a lot of manual labor, modularize components into a truly mobile ready to use package, add more robotic material handling, soup up the control system, cut down to half the people, and automate completions.

  • Cuts labor.  They’ve got 3 people where they had 6.
  • Improves safety, now on 3 rigs running for 8 months, zero loss time incidents.  I asked how many he’d have expected in that time – 6.
  • Controllability and knowledge management.  Once automated, we can turn to a statistical management, not a black art.
  • Speed.  The units themselves are small units, so a bit slower in use if I follow correctly.  But more controllability means more predictability.  And a ready- to-use design means faster up, faster down, higher percentage of time on.

Quote: we won’t be building any more conventional ones.  These are expensive day rates, but all fully utilized.

 

Baker Hughes (NYSE:BHI) picked up another one of the awards with a steerable drilling liner technology called SureTrak.  Basically, same directional steering and drilling system, within liner in place, packed with logging-while-drilling and measurement-while-drilling sensors, once done, unhook the liner, and just leave it there.  Brand new, done it 8 times now, with Shell and Statoil according to one of the sales managers.  Same as before, automate and integrate a process, allow you to solve different and more technical problems, and deliver speed, less time up and down.

 

Eventually, we will automate our industry and move it all the way to the information age.  REALLY automate it.  Until then, one step at a time.  That sounds odd from an industry that uses seismic and ROVs and supercomputers.  But one of the guys at the Weatherford booth said it best when asked about the digital oilfield – is anyone yet using all of your digital oilfield software the way you think it should be used?  Answer, no, it’s all still very silo’d.

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  1. […] I had a chance to wander around the Offshore Technology Conference this week and chat about some of the technologies on display. OTC is still heavily a mechanical engineer’s conference.  Despite the high tech nature of the industry, in large part vendors are not yet leading customers, and steel still rules the day in technology. […] Cleantech Blog […]

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