Smart Cities

On November 5, 2013, in Blog, by Frank Ling

Two events I attended this month brought home the importance of cities as centers of solutions for urban sustainability and climate change. In the absence of a global agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions, cities around the world have already made efforts to decarbonize their economies. Global networks like the C40 include energy and climate as major issues that cities need to tackle if they are to be responsible stakeholders.
LockeMy colleagues at Cypress Rivers invited me to attend the China 2.0 Forum at Stanford University. The keynote speaker was one other than US Ambassador to the PRC, Gary Locke. While the focus of his talk was on the need for financial reforms in China, Ambassador Locke made note of country’s crucial role in the climate problem and how local governments were already taking the initiative there. Every week, the US embassy in Beijing is being contacted by city and country officials who are finding a wide variety of technologies from waste management to transportation solutions.

Indeed, the opportunities are enormous for win-win as American companies can provide the necessary know-how to help these cities find appropriate solutions for their energy and environmental challenges.

SCWOver in Asia, the concept of smart cities have been promoted for several years. Although there is no standard definition, a smart city is characterized as one that uses well designed planning and advanced ITC to create conditions that are conducive to economic growth comfortable lifestyles, and responsibility for the environment.  As a technology driven country, Japan has made enormous efforts in this area with several model cities. Among them, Yokohama is considered one of the “smartest” and has been the host of the annual Smart City Week. These include innovations for local energy production and delivery, water procurement and distribution, and waste management and recycling.

Another highly touted model in Japan is the Kitakyushu Model, which offers know-hows in urban development by integrating waste management, energy management, water management, and environment conservation. Case studies include Kitakyushu Ecotown which has high concentration of recycling plants. In a toolkit in the package, it also has a checklist for making a master plan. They are available on the web.

This year, the discussion at Smart City Week focused on the concept of public-private partnerships (PPPs). Also known as business to government (B2G), it is a framework at the city and municipal level for facilitating, and in some cases, financing the implementation of infrastructure projects. Not only do technology providers play an important role in these relationships, real estate are often promoting these types of projects from energy efficient buildings to urban restructuring. Moreover, these projects must also look at how to better engage residents as stakeholders in their communities. While technology plays an important role, awareness and behavior play as important of a role.

What makes innovation at the city so important in the global scheme is that successes at this scale can be easily learned from each other. These experiences to share ideas and what works can build the confidence and trust needed towards building a global consensus to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Indeed, smartening our cities will be an ongoing process but meetings like Smart City Week give leaders and implementers to discuss what works, what doesn’t, and why.

 

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