MIT Energy Summit 2013

On March 15, 2013, in Blog, by Frank Ling

The key message coming out of the MIT summit was whether if low natural gas prices will have an impact on investing in alternative energy technologies. While the wind market in the US has added significant capacity in the last few years, the availability of cheap natural gas has made them less competitive.

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California’s Cleantech War – Prop 23

On October 29, 2010, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

According to pick your favorite cleantech and carbon media outlet, California is at war.  AB 32 is California’s carbon cap and trade law.   The law is most the way ready to implement, with the rulemaking in process now.  It’s aimed squarely at two goals, one, reduce California’s greenhouse gas emissions, and two, since such a […]

Big Week in the "Real" CSR – Climate Saving Regulation

On May 14, 2010, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

It’s been a big week in Greenhouse Gas regulation land.  Huge boost for cleantech sales executives and afficianados everywhere. EPA announces a slightly delayed and somewhat more limited GHG regulation rule. Starting in July 2011, all facilities greater than 75,000 tons per year in emissions will have to get GHG permits. And John Kerry and Joe […]

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Why Can’t Tom Friedman Find Cleantech?

On November 20, 2009, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

Thomas Friedman, one of my favorite authors, had an editorial this week entitled, “America must lead in energy technology“. As with most of his recent writings and speeches, it’s targeted around the thesis of his Hot, Flat and Crowded book, which basically argues that a combination of climate change, globalization, and population growth are creating […]

Cap-and-Trade: How it works and why it’s the been the option of choice

On July 17, 2009, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

In the run up to Copenhagen and the debate over Waxman-Markey, I think it’s worth laying out some of the key debating points on how cap and trade works and why it’s been our weapon of choice to date in the climate change fight. I like to think of our carbon and energy problem as […]

If Larry King Wrote My Column….

On May 18, 2009, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi You heard it here first: the energy consultancy Douglas-Westwood is claiming in a May 11 white paper that “peak oil” may have already happened, as far back as October 2004, and that the oil price boom followed by economic collapse is indicative of how things will play out over the decades […]

Director of Congressional Bugdet Office on Cap and Trade

On May 11, 2009, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

A couple of days ago the Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf wrote about his Senate testimony on cap and trade revenue redistribution on his blog late last week. Worth a quick read, the main text below. The full 28 page testimony is linked in his note. It’s worth noting that the homepage of the […]

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BlogRoll Review: Space Beams, Leaded Batteries, and Sins

On April 16, 2009, in Blog, by Frank Ling

This seems like something out of a James Bond movie. There is a startup, Solaren, which is trying to build panels in space that converts sunlight into a radio frequency beam aimed at a receiving station near Fresno. The station then converts the radio waves into electricity. Megan Treacy at EcoGeek says: “If everything goes […]

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Throwing down the gauntlet to Secretary Clinton

On February 24, 2009, in Blog, by Marc Stuart

By Marc Stuart Secretary Clinton’s weeklong trip to Asia was notable for a number of firsts. The first time a new Secretary of State of a new administration has opened her tenure by flying west, rather than east. Well, George Schultz apparently went south, as the exception that proves the rule. It’s also the first […]

Renewables That Even Coal-Based Utilities Can Love

On February 2, 2009, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi Generalizations are always tricky, but it’s safe to say that many employees of many electric utilities whose generation plants are mainly coal-fired have a hard time feeling very enthusiastic about renewable energy. You can imagine the rants: renewables are tiny and negligible, renewables aren’t baseload, renewables are for wimps. So, it’s […]

Climate Change Policy Thoughts, McCain, Palin, Obama, Et al

On September 12, 2008, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

Those of you that know me know that fighting climate change is an issue near and dear to my heart – and day to day life, since I am currently involved with a start up working on helping to deliver even better transparency and environmental integrity to carbon credits. So as a small government, energy […]

The Shiny Copper Penny Plan for Energy and Cleantech

On September 2, 2008, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

I wrote a piece last week arguing that McCain / Palin was my energy/cleantech dream ticket, and promptly got slammed by my readers on the left (who generally think McCain’s plans for the environment /cleantech investing are nowhere near aggressive enough and that Palin is way too conservative), AND friends on the right (who think […]

Green Jobs or Industrial Calamity? Dueling Economic Models in Carbon Politics

On July 7, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi In early June, the U.S. Senate considered the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act (S. 2191), which proposed the establishment of a cap-and-trade system for CO2 emissions, analogous to the cap-and-trade program in place in the U.S. for acid rain pollutants since the mid-1990′s. Predictably, the bill was defeated, before even going to […]

Cap-and-Trade Gold in the Golden State

On July 2, 2008, in Blog, by John Addison

By John Addison (7/2/08). Obama and McCain have both stated that climate change requires decisive action. Both support cap-and-trade, putting a limit (cap) on greenhouse gases and enabling the market to work by allowing the trading of permits. How would this work in the United States? We will all learn from California’s progress with its […]

Super Tuesday was Super for US Carbon Cap and Trade

On February 9, 2008, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

One things for sure, post Super Tuesday with Governor Mike Huckabee far behind, Mitt Romney out, and McCain the all but crowned Republican nominee, the US is getting a cap and trade system for carbon. The question is which one. I thought I’d track a little of the candidates’ various positions. The major differences that […]

Climate Legislation: Who Gains? Who Loses?

On December 13, 2007, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

Most Americans now agree that something needs to be done to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. Hopefully most Americans now appreciate that this is not a small, but even more so, not a simple problem. I am a big believer that the playing field for our low carbon future should start level, and the market […]

Carbon Taxes…Sorry, I Meant, "Fees"

On June 11, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi For a long time, I have been assuming that U.S. regulations to reduce carbon emissions, when they come, will be in the form of a cap-and-trade program, similar to what is in place in the U.S. for limiting sulfur dioxide emissions. Even though a cap-and-trade system for carbon emissions is probably […]