Worlds of Differences

On June 3, 2013, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

I’ve always known that Americans hold a pretty different view about the state of the energy sector than elsewhere in the world, but never really knew how to characterize those variances. Today, I write in gratitude, thanking the efforts of Sonal Patel, senior writer at Power magazine.  Patel developed this helpful visual framework summarizing the […]

The End of Nuclear Power? Or Just the Beginning?

On August 7, 2012, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

This week’s news: US NRC freezes decisions on new reactor, license renewal applications “The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission voted unanimously Tuesday not to issue final decisions on granting licenses to build new nuclear power reactors and 20-year license renewals to existing ones, pending resolution of the agency’s waste confidence rule overturned by a court in June. […]

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Banking on a Low-Carbon Energy Future

On January 9, 2012, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

One of the world’s largest banks, London-based HSBC (NYSE: HBC) issued last September a very interesting research report entitled “Sizing the Climate Economy”. At less than 60 pages, it’s an excellent read for those interested in the future growth of the advanced energy economy.  There are really too many highlights to capture all of them in this […]

Predictions For Cleantech In 2012

On December 1, 2011, in Blog, by Dallas Kachan

It’s December again (how did that happen!?) and our annual time for reflection here at Kachan & Co. So as we close out 2011, let’s look towards what the new year may have in store for cleantech. There are eggshells across the sector for 2012. Global economic uncertainty in particular is leaving some skeptical about […]

A Fusion Reactor Hollywood Could Love

On November 28, 2011, in Blog, by Dallas Kachan

Some latest scuttlebutt from the world of nuclear fusion has all the ingredients of a Hollywood thriller screenplay (and for those who remember Inside Greentech’s Greentech Avenger, you know I know scuttlebutt!) There’ve been all kinds of cinematic ideas, and personalities, on the front lines of the crazy world of cleantech innovation. Wild claims from charismatic mad […]

A World of Hurt

On November 21, 2011, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

Seemingly generating nary a ripple here in the U.S., the International Energy Agency (IEA) just issued its 2011 World Energy Outlook – its annual synopsis on the future of the global energy sector.  If ignorance is bliss, then we’re certainly blessed by generally not bothering to confront the pretty-alarming conclusions of the report.  A pastiche of the highlighted snippets in the Executive Summary, when […]

The Winter of Nuclear Energy

On August 10, 2011, in Blog, by John Addison

On March 11, 2011, an earthquake then tsunami triggered escaping radiation from nuclear reactors near millions of people in Japan. On Sunday, August 7, a group of the world’s greatest musicians performed an inspiring benefit concert to support disaster relief in Japan. Crosby, Stills & Nash, Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, Jason Mraz, The Doobie Brothers, […]

Cleantech Investing: A View From 21

On May 16, 2011, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

Ordinarily, I let my fellow blogging colleague Neal Dikeman of Jane Capital take the lead in covering cleantech IPOs and publicly-traded stocks.  However, I recently received the May 2011 newsletter from 21Ventures, and found the commentary by David Anthony on cleantech public equities an interesting complement to Neal’s most current take – sufficiently so to expound upon it herein. […]

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Fukushima: Where It Stops, Nobody Knows

On March 21, 2011, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

The staggering trifecta of disasters in Japan created images of horror that will last for decades. A 9.0 magnitude earthquake shook buildings hundreds of miles away, sending office workers in Tokyo skyscrapers scrambling under desks while trembling video recorded the screams of terrified occupants and the freakish sight of rippling floors and walls. A massive […]

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“Power Hungry” is Filling, But Not Fully Satisfying

On February 28, 2011, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

It had been on my nightstand for awhile, but I finally got around to finishing Power Hungry: The Myths of ‘Green’ Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future by Robert Bryce. According to his own bio on the book jacket, “Bryce has been producing industrial-strength journalism for two decades” –whatever “industrial-strength” is supposed to […]

Renewable Energy Almost Equals Nuclear Energy in USA

On December 28, 2010, in Blog, by John Addison

Nuclear electric power accounted for 11% of primary energy production and renewable energy accounted for 11% of primary energy production” during the first nine months of 2010. renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass/biofuels, geothermal, solar, water, and wind) accounted for 10.9% of domestic energy production and increased by 5.7% compared to the same period in 2009. Meanwhile, nuclear power accounted for 11.4% of domestic energy production but provided 0.5% less energy than a year earlier.