Peter Huber: Low-Confidence in Low-Carbon

On June 9, 2009, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi A few weeks ago, I wrote here that it is often a good thing to read and reflect upon intelligently-crafted opinions that differ from those you hold. A good example is offered by the essay “Bound to Burn” by Peter Huber, a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute. In this thought-provoking […]

If Larry King Wrote My Column….

On May 18, 2009, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi You heard it here first: the energy consultancy Douglas-Westwood is claiming in a May 11 white paper that “peak oil” may have already happened, as far back as October 2004, and that the oil price boom followed by economic collapse is indicative of how things will play out over the decades […]

Gridlock Windblock

On April 27, 2009, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi I don’t know if it’s a myth, but I’ve heard it said that a city’s suicide rates and average wind speeds are correlated. According to the claim, there may be something fundamental about human biology – perhaps within the inner ear – that makes windiness tend to drive people crazy. Whether […]

The Energy Policy Act of 2008

On October 6, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi Betcha didn’t know that there was an Energy Policy Act of 2008, did you? Well, you won’t find any bill of that name. But, the passage of last week’s appropriately titled “Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008″ is almost tantamount to an energy bill. The Senate prepared a nice summary of […]

Inspired Windspire

On September 26, 2008, in Blog, by Cristina Foung

by Cristina Foung(writing from West Coast Green) My favorite green product of the week: the Mariah Power Windspire What is it?The Mariah Power Windspire is a vertical axis “plug-n-produce wind power appliance.” It’s only 30 feet tall, with a two foot radius. It’s rated for winds up to 100 MPH and (based on initial testing) […]

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There’s water in dem dar clouds!

On August 3, 2008, in Blog, by Paul O`Callaghan

With seawater covering seventy-one per cent of the Earth’s surface, at an average depth of four kilometers, and another 1,000,000,000,000,000 liters of water in the first kilometer alone of the earth’ atmosphere, water could hardly be described as a rare element. Its more a case of ‘water water everywhere and not a drop to drink‘. […]

A Boon(e) for Wind

On July 21, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi It’s been about a year since T. Boone Pickens announced that his investment firm BP Capital Management (note that BP stands for “Boone Pickens”, and thus the company bears no relation to the oil behemoth BP) planned to invest about $6 billion to install the world’s largest windfarm of nominally 4,000 […]

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Aloha

On June 16, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi I have the pleasure of writing this posting from one of the most beautiful places on the planet, Hawaii, where I am lucky enough to travel regularly to visit family. In 1995, while lounging on the Big Island, I decided to shift my career away from conventional energy towards alternative energy. […]

"A Special Report on the Future of Energy" by Mother Jones

On May 12, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi I’ve never been a fan of the periodical Mother Jones – it’s always seemed a bit too “alternative” for me. That said, I was recently given a copy of the May/June 2008 issue – a special report on the future of energy – and was surprised by the quality and balance […]

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Liquid (Green) Goodness for the 21 and Over

On May 1, 2008, in Blog, by Cristina Foung

by Cristina Foung My favorite green product of the week: VeeV Açaí Spirit What is it?VeeV is a liqueur (yep, in the US you have to be 21+ to drink it) made from açaí berries – these berries come from the Amazon and are known as a superfood full of nutrients and antioxidents (far higher […]

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The Answer May Be Blowing in the Wind

On April 24, 2008, in Blog, by Cristina Foung

by Cristina Foung My favorite green product of the week: Southwest Windpower Skystream 3.7 Wind Turbine What is it?The Skystream 3.7 is a residential wind generator that hooks into grid-tied homes. It has an estimated energy production of 400 kWh per month (at 12 MPH or 5.4 m/s). Its rotor measures 12 feet and towers […]

The Increasing Ubiquity of Cleantech

On March 3, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi I have subscribed to Forbes for over a decade because, unlike many other popular business journals, it seems to have a genuine voice — even if I sometimes disagree with it. On a plane flight from Cleveland to L.A. last Thursday night, I read the March 10, 2008 issue, and was […]

Powering the Planet

On January 28, 2008, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi “Powering the Planet” is the title of an extraordinary speech that is regularly given by Nate Lewis, Professor of Chemistry at CalTech. It is a bit long and detailed, but very much worth reading, as it elegantly frames the scale of the worldwide energy/environmental challenges to be faced in the coming […]

2007 Roundup

On December 31, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi As has become my custom, with the year drawing to a close, I now look in the rear-view mirror and try to distill what I see. In no particular order, here are my top ten reflections on 2007: 1. Popping of the ethanol bubble. Not long ago, it seemed like anyone […]

Offshore Wind Report

On December 11, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi Last week, I traveled to Berlin with a delegation representing Northern Ohio’s Regional Energy Development Task Force to attend the European Offshore Wind Conference and Exhibition, put on by the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). We visited to learn about the status of offshore wind energy technologies, as part of the […]

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What I Read on My Summer Vacation

On September 10, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi In the spirit (though not the length) of a back-to-school book report, I dedicate this column to reviewing three energy-related books that I read in the last few weeks as the dog-days of summer wound to a conclusion. Cape Wind I first read Cape Wind by Wendy Williams and Robert Whitcomb, […]

LIPA-Suction: A Shift in the Future of U.S. Offshore Wind

On August 27, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi This past week, it was reported (for instance, see article in Newsday) that the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), or at least its Chairman Kevin Law, was in favor of pulling the plug on the 140 megawatt wind project being developed just south of Jones Beach by FPL Energy, a subsidiary […]

Big, Green Power is Flowing – But Where Are the Power Lines?

On July 19, 2007, in Blog, by Neal Dikeman

I had the opportunity recently to speak with Stuart Hemphill, the Director of Renewable and Alternative Power for Southern California Edison (SCE), the power company for Los Angeles and Southern California, on SCE’s activities and views of renewable and green power. SoCal Edison is a subsidiary of Edison International (NYSE:EIX). Stuart has a direct team […]

High-Altitude Wind Farms

On July 2, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi Having been working in the cleantech field for almost decade, it is rare anymore for me to see or hear about something that I find revolutionary. However, a recent article in The Economist profiled a new technology concept that threw me for a loop: a multi-pronged wind turbine contraption floating aloft […]

Pepsi Generation

On April 30, 2007, in Blog, by Richard T. Stuebi

by Richard T. Stuebi Today, PepsiCo (NYSE: PEP) announced that it was buying from Sterling Planet about 1.1 billion kwh worth of renewable energy credits (RECs) per year for the next three years to offset 100% of its corporate electricity requirements in the U.S., thereby making Pepsi the largest buyer of green power in the […]

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